Vistancia Village Approved Front Yard Trees

Argentine MesquiteArgentine Mesquite (Prosopis alba)

Description

Native to South America, the Argentine mesquite is a beautiful tree with darker bark and a more vigorous growth rate than many other mesquite trees. Here in Southern Arizona, it grows to 40 feet high with a spread of 60 feet or more. Fast growing with a wide crown, Argentine mesquite trees are not recommended for small urban spaces. Young trees are quite contorted and asymmetrical. With proper training, Argentine mesquite becomes a large, picturesque shade tree. Greenish yellow flowers appear in late spring and are followed by 3″ to 5″ long, beige seedpods or “beans” as they are frequently called. There are several hybrids of Argentine mesquite making identification difficult. Argentine mesquite (Prosopis alba) is larger with a rounder, wider crown than its close relatives.

Maintenance

Plant this mesquite tree almost anytime, though it establishes best when planted in the fall. It tolerates most soil conditions, provided there is sufficient drainage. Do not plant Argentine mesquite in turf. Water thoroughly when first planted, and water every three to four days for the first two or three weeks. Thereafter, water every 7 to 10 days for the first year. Once established, Argentine mesquite requires little to no additional water. Overwatering or irrigating too shallowly will result in a huge crown and an insufficient root system that may cause the tree to fall in high winds. Young Argentine mesquite trees should be staked securely and trained to develop a straight trunk and strong branch architecture. Prune to thin, shape or raise the crown in late summer. Pruning in the spring or early summer encourages rampant growth. Seedpod litter may require cleanup in high traffic areas.
Size: 40′ x 60′
Flower Season: Late Spring
Exposure: Full Sun
Water: Low
Hardiness: 15°F

Blue Leaf WattleBlue Leaf Wattle (Acacia saligna)

Description

Fast evergreen tree to 25′ tall & as wide. Foliage often has a distinctly glaucous cast, especially in youth. Habit is rounded & somewhat weeping, with flowers that are dark golden yellow, almost orange, heavily produced in late winter. Damaged below 20 degrees F, Drought tolerant when established. Full sun-part shade. Tolerates wet, heavy soil. Deep rooted. Eroson control. Prune gradually to avoid heavy sucker.Acacia saligna grows as a small, dense, spreading tree with a short trunk and a weeping habit. Like many Acacia species, it has phyllodes rather than true leaves; these can be up to 25 centimeters long. This tree attracts ants due to its surgery sap , which are believed to reduce the numbers of leaf-eating insects. The yellow flowers appear in late winter and early spring, in groups of up to ten bright yellow spherical flower heads. The fruit is a legume, while the seed is oblong and dark to black in color.

Size: 25′ x 15′
Flower Season: Late Spring
Exposure: Full Sun
Water: Low
Hardiness: 15°F

Blue Palo VerdeBlue Palo Verde (Cercidium floridum)

Description

Blue palo verde tree is easily distinguished by its blue-green bark and brilliant yellow flower display. It can grow to 25 feet tall with a 25 foot spread. Its tiny leaves are cold and drought deciduous but, due to its blue-green color, it looks evergreen from a distance. Blue palo verde tree is naturally multi-trunked with a low hanging canopy. Known for its fantastic mid-spring flower display, it is native to Southern Arizona. Formerly, blue palo verde was known as Cercidium floridum. Recently renamed Parkinsonia florida, blue palo verde tree is often hybridized with other “Parkinsonia” species producing cultivars with remarkable differences in form and character.

Maintenance

Blue palo verde tree should be planted in full or reflected sun and in soil with good drainage. This tree requires substantial pruning in the early stages to develop a “walk under” canopy. Prune only in warm weather. Cold weather pruning causes its limbs to die back and may introduce infection. Although palo verde beetles are commonly found in and around this tree, they cause little harm as long as the tree is healthy. Water young trees weekly in the summer; monthly in winter. Once established, blue palo verde trees survive on low amounts of moisture. Water established blue palo verde only during periods of extended dry weather. Supplemental irrigation will greatly increase growth rate and canopy density.
Size: 25′ x 15′
Growth rate: ~36 in/year
Flower Season: Late Spring – Summer
Exposure: Full Sun
Water: Low
Hardiness: 15°F

Cascalote (Caesalpinia cacalaco)

Description:

Fast growing tree with beautiful foliage, spectacular flowers that blooms in fall and winter? This medium-sized tree has circular leaves, textured bark and winter flowers. Native to Mexico, Cascalote produces beautiful yellow flowers during the cooler months of fall and winter. It is hardy to 20 F, but will lose its leaves if temperatures dip into the 20’s.  At maturity, the approximate size is 20′ x 20′.

 

MAINTENANCE: Cascalote is relatively a low-maintenance tree. It can be grown as a single or  multi-trunk tree. Prune in the summer removing dead and crossing branches. Weekly irrigation is required throughout the summer and once monthly in the winter. I do not fertilize my Cascalote, but a slow-release or organic fertilizer can be applied if desired. Occasionally, some Cascalotes have been affected in the springtime by an insect known as a Psyllid which is a tiny insect that sucks on the leaves causing the tree to lose its leaves. Look closely at the leaves and you will see little white dots and shiny honeydew on the leaves. The best method to take care of this problem is to diagnose it quickly and spray off the leaves with a strong jet of water every day to help prevent more leaf loss. For those not opposed to using pesticides, applying a systemic insecticide such as Merit, (available in Bayer Advanced Garden Tree & Shrub Insect Control), will take care of the problem. If your tree has lost all of its leaves, they will grow back, but will require one of the two treatments in order for the tree to retain them and recover. 

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